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4: Individuals vs. Groups by Prindle Institute for Ethics

4: Individuals vs. Groups

by Prindle Institute for Ethics

Product Details

Running Time
1 Hr. 04 Mins.

Description

As a group or nation, we like to own pets and keep people in certain kinds of jails, but Lori Gruen will explain to us why she thinks our current practices might be problematic as they relate to the autonomy and dignity of individuals (including animals) in captivity.

There is a worldwide organ shortage. As a group, we have an interest in procuring organs of the recently dead. Martin Wilkinson will explain to us how difficult it is to balance that need against individual rights (even after they’re dead). Follow us on Twitter @Examiningethics.

Go to our website to see our show notes @ examiningethics.org.


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19: Climate Justice

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Wed, Apr 26, 2017


Happy Earth Month! Many people think of climate change as something that will affect the world equally sometime in the distant future. But that's not true. Some communities are already experiencing the effects. Join special guest host Jen Everett and producers Christiane Wisehart and Sandra Bertin as we learn how to challenge our thinking about the environment with scholar Kyle Whyte.

What do you think? Send us a comment or a voice memo to: examiningethics@gmail.com.

Follow us on Twitter @ExaminingEthics. You can also find us on Facebook.

Show Notes:

Kyle Whyte, Timnick Chair in the Humanities and Associate Professor of Philosophy & Community Sustainability at Michigan State University
"Food Sovereignty, Justice and Indigenous Peoples: An Essay on Settler Colonialism and Collective Continuance" by Kyle Whyte
"Ethics of Caring in Environmental Ethics: Indigenous and Feminist Philosophies" by Kyle Whyte and Chris Cuomo
Citizen Potawatami Nation
Jennifer Everett, Associate Professor of Philosophy and Co-Director of the Environmental Fellows Program at DePauw University
Criticism of Disney's Pocahontas
Jainism
Feminist Perspectives on Power
Aristotle

Thanks to Evelyn Brosius for our logo. Photo is by Larry Liggett. Music used in this episode (in order of appearance):

“Badlands” by Cory Gray
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"A Certain Lightness" by Blue Dot Sessions
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0
"Heather" by Blue Dot Sessions
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0
"Planting Flags" by Blue Dot Sessions
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0
"One Quiet Conversation" by Blue Dot Sessions
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0
"Big Because (Instrumental)" by Minden
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0

To contact us, email examiningethics@gmail.com.

The post 19: Climate Justice appeared first on Examining Ethics.



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18: Ethics of Protest, Part One

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Thu, Mar 30, 2017


On this episode, producer Sandra Bertin tells the story of the Freeman Field Mutiny, a protest that led to the desegregation of the United States military. Even though the men who participated in the protest were peaceful and nonviolent, they were still criticized for their methods of protest. This got us thinking, is it ever okay to criticize a protester's methods? Or should we be focusing on something else?

What do you think? Send us a comment or a voice memo to: examiningethics@gmail.com. We're doing another show on the ethics of protest at the end of May, so your comments might make it into that episode!

Follow us on Twitter @ExaminingEthics. You can also find us on Facebook.

Show Notes:

More information about the photograph we've used for this episode
Tuskegee Airmen
J. Todd Moye, professor of history at University of North Texas
Alan Gropman, author of Air Force Integrates, 1945-1964
Coleman Alexander Young, the lieutenant colonel who organized the protest
Wendell Freeland, one of the Freeman Field protesters
Roger "Bill" Terry, the Freeman Field protester who was charged with "jostling"
Larry Bothe
Freeman Army Airfield Museum
Derek Ford, assistant professor of education at DePauw University

Special thanks to the Veteran Voices of Pittsburgh, who allowed us to use parts of their interview with Wendell Freeland.

Thanks to Evelyn Brosius for our logo. Music used in this episode (in order of appearance):

“Badlands” by Cory Gray
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Galoshes" by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"A Catalog of Seasons" by Blue Dot Sessions
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0
"Tweedlebugs" by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Dixie Outlandish" (Public Domain)

To contact us, email examiningethics@gmail.com.

The post 18: Ethics of Protest, Part One appeared first on Examining Ethics.



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17: Achievement Matters

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Wed, Feb 22, 2017


What are achievements and how should we think about them? How should we talk about them?

Philosopher Gwen Bradford's work on the nature of achievement inspired us to talk about the ethics of naming achievements for other people. Can you tell someone they have achieved something if they don't think they have?

What do you think? Send us a comment or a voice memo to: examiningethics@gmail.com.

Follow us on Twitter @ExaminingEthics. You can also find us on Facebook.

Show Notes:

Listeners can receive a 30% discount on Gwen Bradford's Achievement from Oxford University Press
Gwen Bradford
Gwen Bradford recently gave two fascinating talks on the nature of achievement at the Prindle Institute

Achievement - What is it and why does it matter
Uniqueness, Intrinsic Value, and Reasons

Stella Young's Ted Talk, "I'm Not Your Inspiration"

Thanks to Evelyn Brosius for our logo. Music used in this episode (in order of appearance):

“Trockne Blumen” by Franz Schubert
Public Domain
“Year of the Nines” by The New Lines
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
"Golden Hour" by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Hungaria" by Latch? Swing
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 FR
"Balti" by Blue Dot Session
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0

To contact us, email examiningethics@gmail.com.

The post 17: Achievement Matters appeared first on Examining Ethics.



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BONUS: Wishes of the Dead from Hi Phi Nation

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Wed, Feb 15, 2017


Should society always follow the wishes of the dead?

Listen to friend of the podcast Barry Lam dissect this question in the first episode of his new podcast, Hi Phi Nation.

We'll be back with regularly scheduled programming on February 22nd, 2017.

Show Notes:

Barry Lam
Hi Phi Nation website
Wishes of the Dead Show notes
Hi Phi Nation (Soundcloud)
Hi Phi Nation (iTunes)

Thanks to Evelyn Brosius for our logo. Music used in this episode (in order of appearance):

“Swing 39” by Latch? Swing
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 FR

All other music can be found on Hi Phi Nation's show notes page.

To contact us, email examiningethics@gmail.com.

The post BONUS: Wishes of the Dead from Hi Phi Nation appeared first on Examining Ethics.



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16: Skepticism and the Skeptical Skeptics Who Use It

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Wed, Jan 25, 2017


A recent trip to the Creation Museum caused producer Sandra Bertin to be very skeptical of, well, skepticism. Sandra returned to the studio to interrogate the idea of skepticism with host of the show Andy Cullison and our other producer, Christiane Wisehart. We turn skepticism inside out and upside down with philosopher Barry Lam and geologist Jeane Pope. Do you have thoughts about skepticism? Send us a comment or a voice memo to: examiningethics@gmail.com.

Follow us on Twitter @ExaminingEthics. You can also find us on Facebook.

Show Notes:

Creation Museum
Barry Lam

Barry has his own podcast, Hi Phi Nation! Episode 1 is already out, and you should download it from iTunes or the show's website.

Jeane Pope
William James
Nelson Goodman's grue paradox
Applied Epistemology

Thanks to Evelyn Brosius for our logo. Music used in this episode (in order of appearance):

“Badlands” by Cory Gray
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
“Bumble” by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
“Galoshes” by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
 “Ritual Two” by Jason Leonard
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0

To contact us, email examiningethics@gmail.com.

The post 16: Skepticism and the Skeptical Skeptics Who Use It appeared first on Examining Ethics.



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15: New Year’s Resolutions

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Wed, Dec 28, 2016


This month, we bring you our New Year's resolutions. But we're not talking about things like eating less sugar--we're discussing our ethics-related resolutions. Listen in as we talk about implicit bias prevention walls, effective altruism and fast fashion. And hey--we'd love to hear what your New Year's resolutions are. Send a voice memo recording of your resolutions to us at examiningethics@gmail.com.

Follow us on Twitter @ExaminingEthics. You can also find us on Facebook.

Show Notes:

Sandra's Resolution

Putting preferred pronouns in email signature
Strategies to Reduce the Influence of Implicit Bias (see especially Strategy 7)
The Bias Fighters
Photographs may help reduce implicit bias

Andy's Resolution

Peter Singer, "Famine, Affluence, and Morality"
Effective Altruism
GiveWell
Earning to Give
Against Charity

Christiane's Resolution

No one wants your old clothes
Waste Couture: Environmental Impact of the Clothing Industry
Fast fashion's high turnover rate

Syrian-American Medical Society
National SEED Project

Thanks to Evelyn Brosius for our logo. Music used in this episode (in order of appearance):

“Badlands” by Cory Gray
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
“Year of the Nines” by The New Lines
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

To contact us, email examiningethics@gmail.com.

The post 15: New Year’s Resolutions appeared first on Examining Ethics.



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14: Back to Basics

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Fri, Nov 04, 2016


Election day is coming up very soon, so we thought we'd give you all some things to think about as you head to the polls (or if you're thinking about abstaining). Our producer Sandra Bertin shares some reporting she did on the ethics of voting. Listen in with our other producer Christiane Wisehart to hear the voices of experts and everyday people discussing their thoughts on how to vote. We managed to get through the entire episode without even mentioning who you should vote for!

Follow us on Twitter @ExaminingEthics. You can also find us on Facebook.

Show Notes:

Second presidential debate in St. Louis, Missouri
Daniel McCarthy, editor of The American Conservative
T.M. Scanlon, Alford Professor of Natural Religion, Moral Philosophy, and Civil Polity, Emeritus at Harvard University

What We Owe Each Other  (Harvard University Press, 1998)

"What Happened in Ferguson?" (New York Times)
Daniel Hopkins, Associate Professor of Political Science at University of Pennsylvania

Political Polarization in American Politics (edited with John Sides) (Bloomsbury Academic, 2015)

Derrick Darby

Rights, Race, and Recognition (Cambridge University Press, 2009)
Uncovering the Voting Rights Act: The Racial Progress Argument in Shelby County (SSRN, 2016)

Jennifer L. Hochschild, H.L. Jayne Professor of Government, Professor of African and African American Studies, and Harvard College Professor at Harvard University

Do Facts Matter? Information and Misinformation in American Politics (co-author Katherine Levine Einstein) (Oklahoma University Press, 2015)

Tommie Shelby, Caldwell Titcomb Professor of African and African American Studies and of Philosophy at Harvard University

Dark Ghettos: Injustice, Dissent, and Reform (Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2005)
We Who Are Dark: The Philosophical Foundations of Black Solidarity (Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2016)
Frederick Douglass (American abolitionist, writer, orator and activist)
William Lloyd Garrison (American journalist and abolitionist)

Elizabeth S. Anderson, Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and John Dewey Distinguished University Professor of Philosophy and Women's Studies at University of Michigan

The Imperative of Integration (Princeton University Press, 2010)

Thanks to Evelyn Brosius for our logo. Music used in this episode (in order of appearance):

“Badlands” by Cory Gray
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
“Lahaina” by Blue Dot Sessions
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0

To contact us, email examiningethics@gmail.com.

The post 14: Back to Basics appeared first on Examining Ethics.



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13: Distrusting the Narrative

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Wed, Oct 26, 2016


A lot of people wouldn’t guess that the first women’s prison in the nation was built in Indiana in 1873. Though it has moved locations and changed names, it is still open and imprisoning women. Its current name is the Indiana Women’s Prison. We talked to two researchers who uncovered stories about the early history of this prison, stories that call the official textbook account into question. But this isn't just the story of the first women’s prison in the nation, it’s also the tale of the journey of the two researchers who exposed the prison’s dark beginnings.

Follow us on Twitter @ExaminingEthics.

View episode transcript

Show Notes:

Indiana Humanities
Indiana's Bicentennial Celebration
Michelle Jones, "Women's Prison History: The Undiscovered Country" in Perspectives on History (February 2015)
Michelle Jones and Lori Record, "Magdalene Laundries: The First Prisons for Women in the United States" in Journal of the Indiana Academy of the Social Sciences (2014) (paywall)
Indiana Women's Prison
Female inmates sterilized in California prisons without approval
Miranda Fricker, Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing
Story about Michelle Jones and Anastazia Schmid's work on Slate
Population of incarcerated women has increased 700% from 1980 to 2014 (The Sentencing Project, "Incarcerated Women and Girls")
Micol Seigel, "Convict Race"
Forthcoming presentation "The Origins of Women’s Prisons in the United States" at American Historical Association by Michelle Jones
Education in prisons reduces recidivism rates (United States Department of Justice)

Thanks to Evelyn Brosius for our logo. Music used in this episode (in order of appearance):

"Badlands" by Cory Gray
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
 "Ritual Five" by Jason Leonard
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"August (Summer Nights)" by Kai Engel
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0
"A Certain Lightness" by Blue Dot Sessions
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0
"Callow" by Blue Dot Sessions
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0
"Planting Flags" by Blue Dot Sessions
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0

To contact the Prindle Institute, email examiningethics@gmail.com.

The post 13: Distrusting the Narrative appeared first on Examining Ethics.



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12: Should Civilians Be Spared?

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Wed, Sep 28, 2016


On today’s episode, we have one major question for philosopher Seth Lazar: is it ever acceptable to kill civilians in war? As with all good questions in philosophy, it turned out to be a lot more complicated than we initially thought. Lazar wrote Sparing Civilians, out now from Oxford University Press. He lays out what it takes for a civilian or soldier to be considered a threat, what it takes for someone be responsible for that threat, and how to weigh risking harm to other people. Then later in the show, host Andy Cullison sits down with producers Sandra Bertin and Christiane Wisehart to discuss what responsibility civilians in the United States have for foreign wars.

What do you think? Send us a voice memo to: examiningethics@gmail.com. Or leave a voicemail: 765-658-5857. We might feature your comment on a future episode!

Follow us on Twitter @ExaminingEthics.

Show Notes:

Seth Lazar
Click on the link to receive a 30% discount on Seth Lazar's Sparing Civilians when you order from Oxford University Press (Please note that the discount may not appear until you get to the checkout cart.)
Last Week Tonight: Drones
Ted Cruz debate: "What it means is using overwhelming air power..."
Donald Trump: "You have to take out their families."
Just War Theory

Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

Michael Walzer
Michael Walzer, Just and Unjust Wars: A Moral Argument with Historical Illustrations
Rethinking Just War Theory (Jeff McMahan)
Some other contemporary critics of Walzer's Just War Theory
Immanuel Kant's "kingdom of ends"
Daniel Pearl

Thanks to Evelyn Brosius for our logo. Music used in this episode (in order of appearance):

“Badlands” by Cory Gray
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
“Lahaina” by Blue Dot Sessions
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0
“Ritual Two” by Jason Leonard
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
“Thaw (Outro)” by Kai Engel
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0

To contact us, email examiningethics@gmail.com.

The post 12: Should Civilians Be Spared? appeared first on Examining Ethics.



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Callout: Ethics of Voting

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Mon, Sep 05, 2016


Producers Sandra and Christiane want to hear your opinions on voting! Not who you are voting for...but how you think about voting. Do you think everyone should vote? Do you think people should vote in their own self interest? What's the right way to protest something you don't like about the election process? Call 765-658-5014 and leave a 1-3 minute voicemail with your thoughts on voting, your name, and your email to contact you with.  Your voicemail could be featured on an upcoming episode!

The post Callout: Ethics of Voting appeared first on Examining Ethics.



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11: Hoosier Hospitality

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Wed, Aug 31, 2016


What does the idea of "Hoosier Hospitality" really mean? In this month's episode, we tell the story of a group of hospitable Hoosiers who--in the face of tremendous wartime hysteria--helped Japanese American students escape West Coast internment camps and resettle in Indiana during World War II. This story inspired our discussion about courage and the ethics of state-determined borders. This episode was made in partnership with Indiana Humanities. This episode is an officially endorsed Indiana Bicentennial Legacy Project.

Follow us on Twitter @ExaminingEthics.

View episode transcript

Show Notes:

Indiana Humanities
Indiana's Bicentennial Celebration
Mike Pence and Syrian refugees in Indiana
Some Indiana lawmakers are concerned about undocumented immigrants
Undocumented immigrants make up 1.8% of Indiana's population
American Isolationism in the 1930s
U.S. government-produced film defending the World War II internment of Japanese American citizens
Executive Order 9066
Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians
Nancy Nakano Conner, "From Internment to Indiana: Japanese Americans, the War Relocation Authority, the Disciples of Christ, and Citizen Committees in Indianapolis"
By 1920, Indiana's population was mostly white and native born (Jim Madison, Hoosiers: A New History, page 191)
Thomas Hamm
Earlham College

Bonus material:

A recent story about a Syrian family resettling here in Indiana
Immigration Reform? Not in Indiana
Indiana Should Avoid Arizona's Immigration Mistakes
New Americans in Indiana

Thanks to Evelyn Brosius for our logo. Music used in this episode (in order of appearance):

"Badlands" by Cory Gray
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
 "Lahaina" by Blue Dot Sessions
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0
 "Ritual Two" by Jason Leonard
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Thaw (Outro)" by Kai Engel
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0

To contact the Prindle Institute, email examiningethics@gmail.com.

The post 11: Hoosier Hospitality appeared first on Examining Ethics.



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10: What Good Is Poetry?

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Wed, Jul 27, 2016


Poet Tarfia Faizullah joins us to discuss her new book, Seam. Tarfia wrote Seam after winning a Fulbright grant to travel to Bangladesh to interview women who were sexually assaulted during the 1971 war with Pakistan. Friend of the podcast and poet Joe Heithaus interviews Tarfia.

Follow us on Twitter @ExaminingEthics.

Episode transcript

Show Notes:

Tarfia's Personal Website
Tarfia's Professor Page
Seam
Bangladesh’s War for Independence
Komola Collective
Landays Couplet
Joe Heithaus

Thanks to Evelyn Brosius for our logo. Music used in this episode (in order of appearance):

"Badlands" by Cory Gray
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Interlude--In Anxious Shadows" by Kai Engel
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0
"August (Summer Nights)" by Kai Engel
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0
"Cloudburst" by Kai Engel
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0
"Puddles and Bars" by Kai Engel
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC-SA 4.0
"Something (Bonus Track)" by Kai Engel
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY 4.0
"Thaw (Outro)" by Kai Engel
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0

To contact the Prindle Institute, email examiningethics@gmail.com.

The post 10: What Good Is Poetry? appeared first on Examining Ethics.



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9: Canal Crisis

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Wed, Jun 29, 2016


This is a story of a failed transportation project that bankrupted the state of Indiana... 200 years ago. We uncover the human suffering this canal system causes and the moral questions it raises. We also discuss questions like: when is it morally permissible to go into debt to fund a big project? When is it OK to tax? This episode was made in partnership with Indiana Humanities. This episode is an officially endorsed Indiana Bicentennial Legacy Project.

 

Follow us on Twitter @ExaminingEthics.

View episode transcript

Show Notes:

Indiana Humanities
Indiana's Bicentennial Celebration

Jim Madison
Modupe Labode
Lee Hamilton
Mitch Daniels

Wabash and Erie Canal Park in Delphi, IN
Mammoth Internal Improvements Act of 1836
Indiana State Constitution, Article 10, Section 5

Potawatomi Trail of Death
Indianapolis Canal
Bethel AME Church
There Goes the Neighborhood Podcast

Bonus material:

Canal Poem Reading by Liza Hyatt
Reading of Indiana's Debt Provision
A Story from Canal Historian Dan McCain

Thanks to Evelyn Brosius for our logo. Music used in this episode (in order of appearance):

"Badlands" by Cory Gray
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
 "Old Strange" by Black Twig Pickers and Steve Gunn
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
 "Red in Black" by Kosta T
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC-SA 4.0
 "Adventure, Darling" by Gillicuddy
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0 DE
 "Old Loutest (Instrumental)" by Weinland
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
 "The Tallest Man in Idaho (Instrumental)" by Michael Howard
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
 "Laid Ten Dollars Down" by Black Twig Pickers
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US
 "Muncie, IN" by We Shore is Dedicated
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY 4.0

To contact the Prindle Institute, email examiningethics@gmail.com.

The post 9: Canal Crisis appeared first on Examining Ethics.



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Update: What Does a Canal Have to Do with Ethics?

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Wed, Apr 27, 2016


We're going on a break this month and the month of May in order to work on a very special project. We've partnered with Indiana Humanities to create a special three-episode miniseries in which we will explore questions in ethics that have been raised by some fascinating moments in Indiana history. We'll reveal the connections between Indiana's failed canal building projects and the ethics of legislation. We'll hear from two experts on the troubling history of the Indiana Women's Prison. We'll explore issues of immigration and refugees in Indiana. If you're not listening in Indiana (and we know a lot of you are not!), we promise this will still be worth your time. We're so excited about the stories we've been gathering, and we hope you'll join us for the first episode of Season Three on Wednesday, June 29. Hot dog!

The post Update: What Does a Canal Have to Do with Ethics? appeared first on Examining Ethics.



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Bonus: Ethics in Focus with David Benatar and David Wasserman

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Wed, Apr 13, 2016


Welcome to the second episode in our “Ethics in Focus” series. These bonus episodes get right to the point for people with backgrounds in ethics or philosophy. There are no explanations, just the full-length interviews with some of our expert guests. Regularly scheduled episodes of Examining Ethics will still be released at the end of every month. But every once and a while, keep an eye out for one of these “Ethics in Focus” interviews. Today's edition of "Ethics in Focus" features our host Andy Cullison's conversation with David Benatar and David Wasserman, authors of Debating Procreation: Is It Wrong to Reproduce? out now from Oxford University Press.

Follow us on Twitter @ExaminingEthics.

Show Notes:

David Benatar
David Wasserman
Debating Procreation: Is It Wrong to Reproduce? (Use this link to receive a 30% discount on this title from Oxford University Press. Discount will appear at checkout.)
Dr. Guy Kahane, "The Moral  Obligation to Create Children with the Best Chance of the Best Life"
Larry Temkin

Some other great links:

David Benatar, "Why Coming into Existence is Always a Harm" (excerpt from Better to Never Have Been)

Thanks to Evelyn Brosius for our logo. Music used in this episode (in order of appearance):

"Swing 39" by Latch? Swing
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 FR
"Giving Tree" by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Bit Rio" by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0

To contact the Prindle Institute, email examiningethics@gmail.com.

The post Bonus: Ethics in Focus with David Benatar and David Wasserman appeared first on Examining Ethics.



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8: To Be a Parent…Or Not

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Wed, Mar 30, 2016


When thinking about whether or not to become a parent, there is a lot more at stake than just deciding when you're ready or if you even want to. But what are the questions we should be asking ourselves when we think about parenting? In this episode, we discuss the ethics of having children and more with Samantha Brennan and Sarah Hannan, the editors of Permissible Progeny: The Morality of Procreation and Parenting, out now from Oxford University Press.

Follow us on Twitter @ExaminingEthics.

Show Notes:

Permissible Progeny: The Morality of Procreation and Parenting
Samantha Brennan
Sarah Hannan
Richard Vernon
David Benatar
Oxford University Press
Elizabeth Brake
Meena Krishnamurthy
Dear Sugar: Moms Who Hate Motherhood
Kylo Ren

Thanks to Evelyn Brosius for our logo. Music used in this episode (in order of appearance):

"Badlands" by Cory Gray
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Summer Spliffs" by Broke for Free
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
"Bumble" by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Galoshes" by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Dixie Outlandish" by John Deley and the 41 Players
From the YouTube Audio Library (Royalty Free)

To contact the Prindle Institute, email examiningethics@gmail.com.

 

 

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Bonus: Ethics in Focus with Caspar Hare

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Wed, Mar 16, 2016


Welcome to a new series called “Ethics in Focus.” These bonus episodes get right to the point for people with backgrounds in ethics or philosophy. There are no explanations, just the full-length interviews with some of our expert guests. Regularly scheduled episodes of Examining Ethics will still be released at the end of every month. But every once and a while, keep an eye out for one of these “Ethics in Focus” interviews. Today's edition of "Ethics in Focus" features our host Andy Cullison's conversation with Professor Caspar Hare, author of The Limits of Kindness out now from Oxford University Press. Hare is a professor of philosophy at MIT, and his work focuses on ethics, practical rationality, and metaphysics. His book The Limits of Kindness addresses questions in moral philosophy by starting with an uncontroversial principle, that being moral “involves wanting particular other people to be better off.”

Follow us on Twitter @ExaminingEthics.

Show Notes:

Caspar Hare
The Limits of Kindness (click on the link to receive a 30% discount on the book!)
Oxford University Press
Article on Transitivity of Preferences
Larry Temkin

Some other great links:

Caspar Hare, "How we (should) decide"
Brief Explanation of Transitivity of Preferences

Thanks to Evelyn Brosius for our logo. Music used in this episode (in order of appearance):

"Swing 39" by Latch? Swing
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 FR
"Sail Boat" by The Underscore Orkestra
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC-SA 4.0
"Swing Gitane" by The Underscore Orkestra
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US

To contact the Prindle Institute, email examiningethics@gmail.com.

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7: There’s No Clear Line in Comedy with Maysoon Zayid

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Wed, Feb 24, 2016


Comedian, actress and tap dancer, Maysoon Zayid joins us to discuss the ethics of comedy, discrimination, and General Hospital. We discuss questions like, "Is it ever okay to make fun of someone?" and "Should you be allowed to make fun of Donald Trump's hair?" Join us as Maysoon answers these questions and more.

Follow us on Twitter @ExaminingEthics.

Show Notes:

Introduction

Maysoon Zayid's TED Talk, "I got 99 problems...palsy is just one."

Andy and Sandra's Interview with Maysoon Zayid

Maysoon Zayid's Wikipedia page
Maysoon's official website
Megan Garber, How Comedians Became Public Intellectuals (The Atlantic)
Some of the comedians Maysoon mentions:

George Carlin
Lenny Bruce
Gilda Radner
Carol Burnett
Amy Poehler
Aron Kader
Dean Obeidallah

The Muslims Are Coming!
New York Arab-American Comedy Festival
Muslim Funny Fest
Shake It Like Taylor Swift (CNN)
I can't go to bed... (xkcd)
Maysoon on Twitter: @maysoonzayid
Ben Carson Does Not Believe a Muslim Should Be President (NBC News)
General Hospital   General Hospital   General Hospital

Some other great links:

Using Humor to Create World Change (Maysoon interviewed by fellow New Jerseyan Marie Forleo)
Maysoon on Countdown with Keith Olbermann

Thanks to Evelyn Brosius for our logo. Music used in this episode (in order of appearance):

"Badlands" by Cory Gray
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Trundle" by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Gravy" by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Golden Hour" by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Dill Pickles" by Heftone Banjo Orchestra
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 4.0

To contact the Prindle Institute, email examiningethics@gmail.com.

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6: The “Burden” of Whiteness

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Wed, Jan 27, 2016


Ever wonder what role white people should people play in fighting against racism? The legendary feminist scholar and racial justice activist Peggy McIntosh has some ideas. Maybe you have also wondered, "why does it always feel like white people avoid the topic of race?" To answer this question, we bring on the philosopher Alison Bailey to discuss a phenomenon known as "white talk." Join us on a journey through whiteness in the United States in which we explore a Crayola crayon factory, police stations in Massachusetts, and Donald Trump claiming to be "the least racist person you will ever meet."

What do you think? Send us a voice memo to: examiningethics@gmail.com. Or leave a voicemail: 765-658-5857. We might feature your comment on a future episode!

Follow us on Twitter @ExaminingEthics.

Show Notes:

Introduction

Rudyard Kipling, The White Man's Burden 

Peggy McIntosh

Peggy McIntosh's Bio
McIntosh's Ted Talk, "How Studying Privilege Systems Can Strengthen Compassion"
The National SEED (Seeking Educational Equity and Diversity) Project
McIntosh's Most Popular Articles
Ta-Nehisi Coates, Between the World and Me
Tamara Beauboeuf's Bio
Beauboeuf's book, Behind the Mask of the Strong Black Woman

Alison Bailey

Alison Bailey's Bio
Alison Bailey’s anthology, The Feminist Philosophy Reader
W.E.B. DuBois’ idea of “flutter” comes from his 1903 book, The Souls of Black Folk
Marilyn Frye’s essay “Oppression” discusses her cage metaphor
Alice McIntyre ideas about white talk are found in her 1997 book Making Meaning of Whiteness
Maria Lugones' essay, "Playfulness, 'World'-Travelling, and Loving Perception" from Women, Knowledge, and Reality: Explorations in Feminist Philosophy

Thanks to Evelyn Brosius for our logo. Music used in this episode (in order of appearance):

"Badlands" by Cory Gray
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"WTS" by Cory Gray
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Floating in Space" by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Dark Matter" by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Caravan" by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Dark Water" by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Hard Won" by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Tell the Future" by Cory Gray
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0

To contact the Prindle Institute, email examiningethics@gmail.com.

This episode was updated on 1/29/16 to include an additional 2.5 minutes of audio from the interview with Peggy McIntosh. 

 

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5: Can Animals Be Moral?

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Fri, Nov 13, 2015


Summary: In this episode, we tackle the question, "Can Animals Be Moral"? Our host, Andy Cullison interviews philosopher Mark Rowlands to get his perspective. Join us on the journey from animal videos on YouTube to metaphors that liken humans to mindless corks bobbing on a sea. We will leave you with not only questions regarding the morality of animals but also, what should you do if they are moral?

Follow us on Twitter @ExaminingEthics.

Show Notes:

Mark Rowlands 

Mark Rowlands' blog
Interview with Rowlands regarding his wolf-dog
"Dog Risks Life in Rescue" (YouTube, CBS)
"Leopard Saves Baby Baboon" (YouTube)
The Criminal Prosecution and Punishment of Animals by E. P. Evans (1906)
Click here to buy Can Animals Be Moral?

Thanks to Cynthia O'Dell for the photograph used in our logo. Music used in this episode (in order of appearance):

"Badlands" by Cory Gray
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Hungaria" by Latch? Swing
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 FR
"Floating in Space" by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Spy Glass" by Kevin MacLeod
From incompetech.com
CC BY 3.0
"Serenity" by Podington Bear
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC 3.0
"Songe D'Automne" by Latch? Swing
From the Free Music Archive
CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 FR

To contact the Prindle Institute, email examiningethics@gmail.com.

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4: Individuals vs. Groups

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Wed, Oct 28, 2015


In this episode of our ethics podcast, director of the Prindle Institute Andy Cullison interviews Lori Gruen and Martin Wilkinson. Gruen talks with Andy about the Ethics of Captivity. Wilkinson talks about the ethics of organ acquisition.

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3: The Right Side of History

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Wed, Sep 30, 2015


In this episode of our ethics podcast, director of the Prindle Institute Andy Cullison joins the cultural historian Chris Hager to discuss the phrase, "the right side of history" that people sometimes use in political arguments. When did we start using this phrase? When is it most often used? Is it legitimate reason to change one's mind about an issue? Listen here to find out.

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2: Systems in Sheep’s Clothing

Author: The Prindle Institute for Ethics
Tue, Aug 18, 2015


In this episode we hear from producers Sandra and Christiane about their voices. Andrew Cullison interviews Rebecca Gordon about her new book Mainstreaming Torture, and Robin Zheng discusses the concept of Yellow Fever.

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More Details

  • Published: November 2015
  • LearnOutLoud.com Product ID: 4081362